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Friday, 08 June 2012 00:00

ISWA Hazardous Waste Seminar & TRP Workshop in Singapore (24th -26th April 2012)

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Text Box: Updating the TRPThe International Solid Waste Association (ISWA) and its partners have joined with the Asia Pacific Regional Development Network of ISWA the Training Advisory and Promotion Centre (TAP) based in Singapore to update the Training Resource Pack for hazardous waste management in developing economies (TRP). A successful earlier version of the TRP was first developed in 2002 by the Hazardous Waste Working Group of ISWA and UNEP. The TRP is currently available on the TRP + website: http://www.trp-training.info/

The first ISWA Hazardous Waste Seminar & TRP Workshop was held between the 24th and the 26th of April 2012 in Singapore. The scope of the event was to improve networks, communication, information and training on hazardous waste management in the Asia Pacific Region, and to update ISWA’s Training Resource Pack for hazardous waste in developing countries. 

The 3-day event was organized by ISWA and WMRAS on behalf of the TRP + Partners UNIDO & UNEP, and held at the Singapore NEA meeting facilities.

More than 50 participants from a wide range of backgrounds (industry, academia, regional and national institutions, consulting bodies and private individuals) and from more than 15 different countries (Singapore, India, Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia, Nepal, Japan, Sri Lanka, Norway, France, Greece etc.,) attended this exceptional event.


Updating the TRP

The International Solid Waste Association (ISWA) and its partners have joined with the Asia Pacific Regional Development Network of ISWA the Training Advisory and Promotion Centre (TAP) based in Singapore to update the Training Resource Pack for hazardous waste management in developing economies (TRP). A successful earlier version of the TRP was first developed in 2002 by the Hazardous Waste Working Group of ISWA and UNEP. The TRP is currently available on the TRP + website: http://www.trp-training.info/<;/a>


The event was divided into a one day seminar, and a two day workshop.

The seminar on day one was formally opened by Mr Andrew Tan, CEO of the Singapore National Environment Agency (NEA).

His speech was mainly focused on the need for proper management of hazardous waste in the Asia Pacific Region, especially for electrical and electronic waste.

As Mr Andrew Tan stated, recycling of electrical and electronic waste often involves exposure to dangerous chemicals (such as lead, mercury and cadmium) which can be toxic to human and the environment. In addition, he highlighted that hazardous waste management is a new concept in many developing countries requiring great attention. 

Mr Andrew’s speech was followed by opening remarks from WMRAS, ISWA, UNIDO and UNEP and technical presentations from experts. (Watch Video 1)

 Video 1: ISWA Hazardous Waste Seminar & TRP Workshop Puzzle Video.

Text Box: PresentationsFormal presentations focused on the waste treatment situation in regional countries and companies, and on descriptions of appropriate technologies & procedures. The presentations showed that much progress has been made in the intervening years, but also that the waste generation pattern is now considerably different, often requiring new approaches and techniques. It has been spotted that end-of life products are currently of increasing concern in the Asia Pacific Region, especially e-waste, as well as chemical stocks and contaminated land. In addition, it has been noted that although modern facilities are available in specific countries in the Region (such as in Australia, New Zealand. Hong Kong, Singapore & India), some waste are still transported to a waste disposal unit in Europe.Several presentations provided updates on currently available treatment and disposal technologies, and highlighted the difficulty to treat wastes such as POPs, pesticide stocks, ODS and other chemical types.Presentations are available on the TRP+ website: http://www.trp-training.info/Presentations were mainly focused on reviewing the waste situation across the region and the progress made in establishing a viable waste industry in Singapore, Hong Kong, India, Australia and New Zealand. The evolution of waste management systems in Malaysia and Indonesia were also presented. An interactive presentation and debate of the TRP+ web portal also took place.


Presentations

Formal presentations focused on the waste treatment situation in regional countries and companies, and on descriptions of appropriate technologies & procedures. The presentations showed that much progress has been made in the intervening years, but also that the waste generation pattern is now considerably different, often requiring new approaches and techniques. It has been spotted that end-of life products are currently of increasing concern in the Asia Pacific Region, especially e-waste, as well as chemical stocks and contaminated land. In addition, it has been noted that although modern facilities are available in specific countries in the Region (such as in Australia, New Zealand. Hong Kong, Singapore & India), some waste are still transported to a waste disposal unit in Europe.

Several presentations provided updates on currently available treatment and disposal technologies, and highlighted the difficulty to treat wastes such as POPs, pesticide stocks, ODS and other chemical types.

Presentations are available on the TRP+ website: http://www.trp-training.info/<;/a>


The second and the third day were dedicated to the update of the TRP Training Resource Pack for Hazardous Waste Management in developing economies including workshop sessions. During the workshops the structure, content and implementation of the TRP+ were discussed. 

Both the seminar and the workshops were attended by a very interactive audience, which contributed fully to the exchange of experience and knowledge.

D-waste was present attending the event, and interacting with other participants. Watch below some interesting interviews from key persons of the event.

In Video 2 Fritz Balkau, Project Coordinator of the TRP-ISWA provides information, and highlights the importance of the TRP Hazardous Waste Seminar & Workshop. In Video 3 Jean Paul Leglise, Chair of the Hazardous Waste Group of ISWA, speaks about the origins of the TRP concept, gives the reasons of supporting it, and states his expectations from the TRP Workshop.

Furthermore, Smail Alhilali programme officer of UNIDO, in Video 4, and Musthaq Memon, programme officer of UNEP, in Video 5, speak about the role of their organization regarding hazardous waste management in developing countries.

Finally, in Video 6, Guah Eng Hock, Chairman of the Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore (WMRAS), speaks about the most significant waste management issues in Singapore.

Video 2: Fritz Balkau, Project Coordinator of the TRP-ISWA 

Video 3:  Mr. Jean Paul Leglise, Chair of the Hazardous Waste Group of ISWA 

Video 4:  Mr. Smail Alhilali programme officer of UNIDO

Video 5:  Mr. Musthaq Memon, programme officer of UNEP

Video 6:  Mr. Guah Eng Hock, Chairman of the Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore (WMRAS)

 


Relative links:

TRP+: http://www.trp-training.info/<;/a>

ISWA: http://;www.iswa.org

UNIDO: http://www.unido.org/<;/a>

UNEP: http://www.unep.org/<;/a>

WMRAS: http://;www.wmras.org.sg

NEA Singapore: http://;www.nea.gov.sg


 

Read 4558 times Last modified on Saturday, 14 July 2012 10:48
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